Yellow Social Media Report 2014: Tiny Takeaways

Yellow social media report 2014 Australia Tiny Takeaways
21 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 0 Google+ 0 LinkedIn 21 Pin It Share 0 StumbleUpon 0 21 Flares ×

Yellow Social Media Report 2014: Tiny Takeaways

The Yellow Social Media Report 2014 has just been released.

In the last couple of years it has provided the Australian marketing and communications community with an in-depth understanding of how social media is being used by individual participants and businesses.

You’ll probably see a fair bit of coverage and conversation about the report over the next 48 hours so I thought I’d try and pull out some bits that might not look like a big deal, but are worth being across.

Here are some of my ‘tiny takeaways’:

Who is responsible for social media in a large business?

77% marketing department, 13% comms department, 10% other.

Social media ‘ownership’ is much debated and if you asked the most progressive businesses they’d probably say it was shared by both marketing and comms given the nature of the beast. Ideally, this stat would be compared with global data to see if Australia was trending in a unique direction.

39% of social users access social media at work, but…

This doesn’t mean people aren’t accessing social media during work hours. It just means that mobile devices are giving people what they need during the day.

Closely linked to this stat: 71% of Australians access social media via smartphones.

The most popular time of day to be active on social media in Australia is…

After work.

In 2013, after work / in the evening was the most popular answer with 53% of respondents saying they accessed social media during this time.

In 2014, this figure jumped to 58%.

Last thing before bed, and first thing in the morning came in second and third.

What does this mean?

It may suggest that businesses should be more active during these periods.

Or, it may suggest that structuring social media moderation protocols need to be adjusted to give businesses the best chance to interact.

Ultimately, budget levels will influence this more than these stats will.

LinkedIn and Instagram show significant signs of growth, but…

The percentage of Australians using LinkedIn in 2012 was 16%. In 2014 it’s 24%.

Instagram was at 16% in 2013 and is at 21% in 2014.

So, does this mean they should be a priority? No. It just means that they continue to solidify their places in the standard social media usage portfolio by owning very specific roles: professional and photo sharing.

45% of Australians stopped using Twitter in the last 12 months…cause for concern?

Not really.

Twitter is an acquired taste for many and often takes a number of failed launches before the ‘aha’ moment happens.

Twitter (the company) is also aware of this and continues to introduce features to keep new users active.

Note: This percentage is based on the 11% of people who stopped using a social media channel in 2013.

Instagram ranks third for usage frequency, behind Snapchat and Facebook

Another question asked of respondents was ‘how often do you use each of the major social platforms’?

As expected, Facebook ranked highly (30 session per week), and given the peer-to-peer nature of Snapchat (32 sessions per week), it ranked highly too.

Instagram came in third with 23 sessions per week, proving that its simplicity continues to resonate more and more.

The official infographic

The stats I’ve pulled out are just a tiny taste of what is a very in-depth report.

Below is a handy infographic which highlights a good portion of the notable data.

Enjoy.

Yellow-Social-Media-Report-2014-Infographic

 

Download the full report at: about.sensis.com.au

Be first to comment